• How long does orthodontic treatment take?

    July 30th, 2012

    Orthodontic treatments are used to correct malocclusion, a condition more commonly known as a bad bite. The length of treatment time varies depending on the severity of the bite problem.

    What is a “bad bite”?

    A bad bite occurs when spacing or alignment problems are present. This often includes teeth that are protruding, crowded, or crooked. Sometimes teeth appear straight, but have an uneven bite because the upper and lower jaws do not align properly. Teeth that are irregularly spaced – either too far apart or too close together – can also cause bite problems.

    Frequent causes of bite problems:

    • Heredity
    • Thumb-sucking
    • Premature tooth loss
    • Accidents

      Benefits of orthodontic treatment:

      Appearance –
      Correcting a bad bite often creates a more attractive smile, which frequently raises the patient’s self esteem.

      Preventing Decay –
      It also results in a healthier mouth. It is much more difficult to thoroughly clean teeth that are crooked, protruding, overlapped, or crowed. This may allow plaque to build up, which can lead to gum disease, tooth decay and even tooth loss. Orthodontic treatment corrects these conditions, so cleaning can be more efficient.

      Avoiding Alignment Issues –
      An uneven bite can interfere with the motions of chewing and speaking. This can cause abnormal wear to tooth enamel, which may require pricey cosmetic restorative treatments, such as crowns or veneers, to correct. It can also lead to problems with the jaws. Orthodontic treatment lessens the likelihood of those issues, as well.

      Types of orthodontic treatment:

      Braces: Metal or ceramic brackets are bonded to the front of teeth. Wires and elastics are attached to the brackets to straighten teeth.

      Invisalign®: Advanced 3D computer images of the patients’ mouth are used to create clear, custom aligners that slowly move teeth. They are nearly invisible and are more comfortable than traditional braces. They are also removable, which makes it possible to continue with normal brushing and flossing.

      Retainers: A retainer is a removable piece worn inside the mouth that uses pressure to force teeth to move into proper alignment. They are used after braces are removed.

      Length of orthodontic treatment:

      Treatment typically ranges from 12 – 36 months. Factors include the age, cooperation level, and growth occurrence of the patient. The complexity of the case also impacts the treatment time.

  • Elements of Braces

    July 27th, 2012

    When coming to our office to have braces put on, you may find yourself feeling a bit intimated and nervous about the experience. We hope to help you feel more at ease by explaining exactly what the different parts of braces are, and what they do.

    Parts of Braces

    • Elastic Tie — This is a very small rubber band, and it holds the archwire in place.
    • Archwire — This is the main part of the braces. It is a wire guide that tracks the teeth. The wire may be moved from time to time during treatment to continue straightening a patient’s teeth.
    •  Loop in Archwire — This is not in all braces. If it is used, it is to close a gap left from a tooth extraction.
    • Bracket — This piece of equipment holds the archwire in place. Formerly, many patients used colored rubber bands to keep the brackets in place, but now since most brackets are cemented on, this is no longer necessary.
    • Headgear Tube — This is a hollow area near the back bands, which allows the headgear to fit into the braces. This is only used on patients who require headgear.
    • Coil Spring — If needed, this would fit between a bracket and the main archwire. Its purpose is to open up the space between the teeth. This is not necessarily used on all patients.
    • Tie Wire — This is another piece of equipment that is used to keep the archwire in place. It is a thin wire that wraps around the bracket.
    • Band — This is a metal band that fits completely around a tooth. It is used to help adhere brackets to the tooth.
    • Hook — This is the piece of equipment that is used to attach the elastics, also known as rubber bands, around the bracket.
    • Elastic — These elastics are used to connect one point of the appliance to another. The purpose is to apply pressure, and encourage the teeth to move into the proper positioning.By defining each appliance we hope you or your child will be less apprehensive about getting braces put on. At the end of your treatment, you will have a bright, straight smile to show off to all of your friends.
  • Sports and Orthodontics

    July 19th, 2012

    We’re halfway through the summer, and the summer months bring an increase in outdoor activities and a greater chance of kids damaging their precious mouths and pearly whites. If you play sports, it’s important that you consult our office for special precautions, such as wearing a mouth guard. A protective mouth guard is advised for playing spring sports such as baseball, soccer, lacrosse and others. Be sure, however, to avoid mouth guards that custom form to your teeth as these will resist any tooth movements we are trying to achieve.

    In case of any accident involving the face, check your mouth and the appliances immediately. If teeth are loosened or the appliances damaged, please schedule an appointment with the office. And don’t forget to ask us about how you can get a mouth guard for yourself.

    Only by using a mouth guard and other forms of facial protection can kids with and without braces avoid serious sports injuries. Please give us a call if you have any questions about mouth guards or your treatment at our office.

  • Top ten tips to keep your braces sparklin’ clean!

    July 12th, 2012

    Keeping your teeth clean is more important than ever when you have braces! Food bits have more spots than usual to hide in your mouth, so you must be diligent in order to avoid bad breath, swollen gums, discolored teeth and cavities. If you remove plaque regularly during treatment, you’ll experience better results and shorter treatment time. Keep plaque at bay with these top ten tips:

    1. One tooth at a time. When you brush, take time with each individual tooth – at least 10 seconds each – and pay careful attention to the spots where your teeth touch your braces.
    2. It’s all about the angles. Brush the tops of your teeth and braces with your brush angled down toward where they meet. Brush the bottoms of your teeth and braces with your brush angled up.
    3. The tooth, the whole tooth, nothing but the tooth. While the front surface of your teeth may seem like the most logical to clean, it’s equally important to clean the inner surface of your teeth (tongue side) as well as the chewing surface. And be sure to clean along your gum line – a key spot for plaque buildup.
    4. Step 1: eat, step 2: clean. While you’re in treatment, it’s important to brush after every meal. Bits of food can easily get caught between braces and teeth, and these food bits interact with bacteria in your mouth to cause decay. The longer food is in contact with your teeth, the greater opportunity for plaque to form. If you are eating somewhere that you can’t brush, thoroughly rinse your mouth with water.
    5. Like a Boy Scout, always be prepared. The easiest way to be sure you can brush after every meal is to get in the habit of taking a toothbrush, toothpaste and floss with you wherever you go. Designate a special container just for your teeth-cleaning tools and keep it in your purse, backpack, or laptop case.
    6. Remove the moving parts. If you have elastic bands or headgear, remove these parts before you brush or floss.
    7. Fluoride is your friend. Fluoride helps prevent cavities. Be sure to brush with fluoride toothpaste, and rinse with fluoride mouthwash.
    8. Pointy brushes reach tiny places. Interproximal brushes (sometimes called proxa brushes or interdental brushes) are cone-shaped and come in very handy for reaching spots around your braces that standard brushes can’t.
    9.  Find the floss for you. Regular floss works for some patients, but others find it easier to work with a floss threader, which helps you get the floss into tight places. Other patients like an all-in-one product called Superfloss, which comes with a stiff end for easy threading, a spongy section for cleaning wide spaces, and regular floss for narrow spaces.
    10.  Make time for the pros. It’s your job to take care of the everyday cleaning. But make sure to visit your dentist regularly while in treatment, to get the deep, thorough cleaning that only a professional can provide. If you need help finding the right Dentist for you, feel free to contact our office – we’d love to help!

    We hope this helps, and remember to give our team a call if you ever have any questions!

  • Independence Day Facts, Tips, and Party Invitations!

    July 03rd, 2012

    It’s hard to believe, but July is already here and half of 2012 has already passed! As July 4th approaches, our team thought it would be
    fun to share some facts and safety tips for celebrating our country’s independence day.

    Fun Facts:

    •  Betsy Ross, according to legend, sewed the first American flag in May or June 1776, as commissioned by the Congressional Committee.
    • The major objection to being ruled by Britain was taxation without representation. The colonists had no say in the decisions of English
      Parliament.
    • The word ‘patriotism’ comes from the Latin patria, which means ‘homeland’ or ‘fatherland.’
    • The first public Fourth of July event at the White House occurred in 1804.

    And what could be more fitting than spending the day in a place called “America”? There are five such places in the country, with the most populous being American Fork, Utah, with 21,941 residents. Check out American Fact Finder.

    Safety Tips:

    • Avoid buying fireworks that are packaged in brown paper because this is often a sign that the fireworks were made for professional displays
      and that they could pose a danger to consumers.
    • Keep a bucket of water or a garden hose handy in case of fire or other mishap.
    • Never carry fireworks in a pocket or shoot them off in metal or glass containers.
    • To prevent a trash fire, be sure to douse the spent fireworks with plenty of water from a bucket or hose after fireworks complete their
      burning and before discarding them.
    • Make sure fireworks are legal before buying or using them.
      What are your plans this 4th of July? Share them with us! We’d love to hear what you and the rest of the community will be doing to celebrate!
      (Don’t forget to make sure there are no restrictions on fireworks! Check out this link to see if fireworks might be an issue for you this year.) Also, check out these 4th of July party invitations, eGreeting cards, and delicious recipes!

      July 4th eCard invitations!

      Happy Independence Day eCards

      Independence Day Recipes

      Photo by shawnajean